Alexandria library

The Royal Library of Alexandria was once considered as the most extensive library in the entire world. It was located at the Alexander city at the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. The library's demolition is remaining a mystery. On the other hand, in 2003 a new library was built near the place of the  old library.

From history:

It is claimed that the library has a private collection of Aristotle. He has a significant contribution to his work in this old library. After Ptolemy III of Egypt, all people and even visitors were also forced to the submission of all the available books. All relevant invented documents and books were in their control. All these pieces of literature were then quickly copied by authorised copyists. The real material was kept into the Library, and the duplicates were distributed to the former holders. Although intruding on the privileges of the merchant, by this, it also helped to make a large stock of books in the comparatively new city. Later the content from the library was sent to different buildings.

There is a covered marble arcade connected the Museum with a together with the grand building. There were also in white marble and stone, architecturally melodious, surely forming an essential part of the massive mound, devoted to educated by the understanding of the first Ptolemy in subsequent the guidance and genius of Demetrios of Phaleron. This was considered as one of the famous and one of the biggest Library of Alexandria. Many names were given to her like the "Mother" library of the Museum that was indeed the leading wonder of the ancient world.

Conclusions:

The old library was the significant achievement of the city because of the substantial contribution of Aristotle's work. But the reason for the destruction of this mega library was still unknown because no such avoidance provides the fundamental truth behind the incident.

Other Alexandria SIGHTSEEING

Catacomb
Catacomb
Pompey’s pillar
Pompey’s pillar
Qaitbay Citadel
Qaitbay Citadel
Romans’ amphitheater
Romans’ amphitheater